Confusion!

I forgot to set my alarm this morning, overslept by three hours (which I haven’t done in a long time), and now can’t seem to get motivated this morning.

Abadinur went so well I got spoiled. It was the most solidly written of the three sections, the one that I hit my rough draft goal on. So there wasn’t too much to do to it. Kadaraita, I know will be difficult, as it brings in characters that resolve all the dangling plots. But Logrozana is trying to kick my ass.

It starts with the problem that, somehow, I missed that Mortathes had wanted out of Logrozana, where he belonged, into Abadinur, where he was stepping on Amarog’s toes. Now, I should have it set up that each of the Lords has their own ‘act’, but I don’t. Amarog and his family dominate Abadinur. Sviera vanishes out of Abadinur and is a shadowy figure until Kadaraita. The mystery players are only hinted at until Kadaraita. But somehow, I’ve got Txikia, Erotheri and Mortathes warring for room in the opening act of Logrozana.

It’s a problem though, because I need Txikia in two places. She needs to be in Logrozana to trigger the war. She’s the one who causes all these problems. But her story rightly belongs in Kadaraita with the other ‘witch-stories’.

This can be fixed. It means stepping up my focus though, because I’ll have to dump a character into Logrozana with no history, make her a loved and sympathetic character, and then ruin all that with Kadaraita. It also means the amount of hints, insinuation and foreshadowing is going to be ridiculous.

‘Inherent’ is an intricate book of course, it tells a story from eight perspectives. It has prophesy, ‘living memory’, and a few visits to the future as well by my favorite witch. It is told in past and present tense, first person and third person. It’s the kind of story that could get away from me in a huge hurry if I’m not careful. But I tried to tell it some other way, and it didn’t want to be told that way. It’s the sort of story that doesn’t make sense told from one perspective.

I love this story. But it is certainly being a problem child right now. I have to write the same battle three times, in three different perspectives. It’s essentially three separate short stories, each with beginning, middle and ending and different characters.

Right now, Mortathes is standing in front of a crowd of captains and politicians and trying to explain why this war will be so different from the Slave-road War, or the uprising and civil war in Anorbe. Thing is, he doesn’t really know either. His goddess won’t tell him anything except that a witch he distrusts is busy obeying the goddesses by changing the world. His job is to follow her lead and take what comes.

Mortathes has never loved any woman except his goddess. He is almost fanatically devoted. But he’s also a stubborn, proud king who resents the danger to his people and the blindness he’s been kept in. He’s been told he may be the only one of his kin to survive this war, and that he doesn’t have any active place in it. For the Lord of the Sun, this isn’t easy to swallow.

His changes are probably the most radical of the lot. He won’t come out of the King-time unscathed, he’ll be changed so much that his very name and title may be lost. He has to weigh his glory and power against obedience, duty, honor, the very things his brothers have struggled with from the start. It’s a rough road for him, and a rough road for me, balancing that internal struggle against the external leadership and glory of a bright hero without a care in the world.

Mortathes is the only character who starts out the story without a trace of bitterness. By the end, when he sits and talks to long-lost family from across the sea, he’s a bitter, jaded king who wishes only to vanish and leave his people to their own devices. It may be that he breaks as badly as his brother, even though he lives.

We’ll see. It depends on whether he can learn to be a reed in the wind, rather than a mighty oak.

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2 Responses to “Confusion!”

  1. “It starts with the problem that, somehow, I missed that Mortathes had wanted out of Logrozana, where he belonged, into Abadinur, where he was stepping on Amarog’s toes. Now, I should have it set up that each of the Lords has their own ‘act’, but I don’t. Amarog and his family dominate Abadinur. Sviera vanishes out of Abadinur and is a shadowy figure until Kadaraita. The mystery players are only hinted at until Kadaraita. But somehow, I’ve got Txikia, Erotheri and Mortathes warring for room in the opening act of Logrozana.”

    o_O

    It’s like the LotR appendices all over again!

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