Heart-Warming

You all know I like the cold, dark side of life. It’s just where I like living. I like cold days, rainy nights, storms and lightning. I like the anti-hero, the villain and the sociopath, nihilist music and apocalyptic writing. It’s not being rebellious, it’s just my preferred taste.

So when my boss (and good friend) came to me last week with a request, I just about laughed it off. Apparently, the second-in-command had left it up to him to write it, and he was quite blunt about not being able to write.

He hands me the notes, and I had to start shaking my head. But the best challenge for a writer is to tackle the things you don’t think you can do. It also was a challenge because we were busy, I kept getting interrupted, and I was standing at the customer service desk. Not my preferred writing space!

A (12? can’t remember for sure) young boy and his sister wanted to make an impact. They came to us, and we wanted to share their generosity.

I wrote it. He loved it. And it’s a great story for the current economic situation. (names changed of course.)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

‘In tough economic times, it’s tempting to start feeling sorry for ourselves. But Andy and Sara wanted to do more.

All his friends had beach-houses, and he wanted to give his parents one too. He opened a lemonade stand, charging 25 cents a glass.

But beach-houses are expensive, and his mom said maybe it was a little ambitious. So after a little discussion, he decided that maybe he should buy groceries with the money he raised.

Groceries for his own family? That would be pretty cool. Andy had a better idea though. How about donating all the food he could buy to the local food bank?

He started telling people what he and his sister were doing, and pretty soon, everyone was in on it. He says ‘they kept giving me dollar bills, even though it was only 25 cents for the lemonade!’

Eventually he raised about $25 dollars and was ready to go shopping, His mom said he could get the most food for his money at Trader Joe’s, so he bought his food at TJ’s and donated it to the food bank.

Awesome job Andy and Sara! We’re proud to have been part of your contribution to the community. Keep up the good work!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

No, it’s not my BEST writing.

However, it’s an amazing thing for a couple of kids to do. And I’d love to see more people doing things like this. It’s money he earned very fairly himself.

Want to do something similar? Help your kids earn some money by cutting lawns or watering plants or selling cookies. Match the money they make. Go to your local grocery story (one that prides itself on customer service) and ask if they will either match the money or give you a discount (not all will, but its worth a try). Then take the food to a food bank or shelter. It’s not much of an investment, and a church group or school or even a neighborhood could make this a huge help to the many people who are hurting right now.

Out of work or don’t have any money to add? Help out. It does take some help from adults.

I’ve been part of things like this since I was a kid. I’ve gone door-to-door asking for donations of canned food for local shelters. It’s awesome. It’s worth the time.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: